HOMEABOUT USADVERTISING INFORMATION CIRCULATION & DISTRIBUTIONCONTACT US
CURRENT ISSUECALENDARNEWSCOVERS
EDITORIAL ARCHIVESEDITORIAL ART GALLERY
ART GALLERY GUIDEATTRACTIONS GUIDECOLLEGE GUIDEDINING GUIDE MUSIC & THEATER SEASON GUIDEYOGA GUIDEADVERTISER LINKS



The book follows Lou’s career
from Warhol to Metallica, and
his personal relationships
from David Bowie
to Laurie Anderson.






“Prince Charles and Bob met
briefly in a transit lounge.
The Prince wanted to know
where Bob got his sneakers.”


A Life in Music

by Andrew Elias

Lou Reed
A Life
by Anthony DeCurtis
Little, Brown & Company

Who better to examine and explore the complicated and remarkable life of Lou Reed, an artist with little use for rock critics, than his favorite music journalist, Anthony DeCurtis? A longtime friend, DeCurtis doesn’t rehash the outlandish myths and jaded misconceptions that surrounded Reed, but rather tells the story of a confused and creative middle-class boy who went from Long Island suburbia to New York City’s subterranean art scene to become one of the most influential artists in rock music and popular culture.

Reed needs no introduction, yet DeCurtis fills the book with great new stories and a touching insight into the human behind the star, the man behind the music. The book follows Lou’s career from Warhol to Metallica, and his personal relationships from David Bowie to Laurie Anderson. There is plenty here for the geek interested in Reed’s recordings and plenty for the rock fan looking for gossip. Somehow DeCurtis successfully balances the tedious tech talk with celebrity gossip.

A well-researched and well-written — and highly recommended — biography of one of the 20th Century’s most revered rock icons.


T Bone Burnett
A Life in Pursuit
by Lloyd Sachs
University of Texas Press

T Bone just might be the most influential and important figure in America’s music scenes that you haven’t heard about. Few producers are more sought-after — by musicians from B.B. King, Bonnie Raitt and Los Lobos to Elvis Costello, Diana Krall and Elton John. He has also been the musical director of television shows, Nashville and True Detectives, and films O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Cold Mountain and The Hunger Games. He has won Grammys and an Oscar.

Acclaimed music journalist, Sachs looks at Burnett’s storied musical career, from the tall Texan’s earliest days in Los Angeles and Woodstock to his stint leading Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue to recent television and recording projects including Lost on the River: The New Basement Tapes, where he asked a small group of young musicians (and Elvis Costello) to add music to long lost Bob Dylan lyrics written in Woodstock almost 50 years ago.

Although T Bone was not involved with the writing of this book, fans of Burnett’s will not be disappointed by the stories about the many musicians he’s worked with and the many recordings he’s made. And if you’re not a fan, you may just be impressed with the life of the man who is the undeclared King of Americana music.


So Much Things to Say
The Oral History of Bob Marley
by Roger Steffens
W.W. Norton & Company

An exhaustive compilation of interviews with the people who knew Marley most intimately — Rita Marley, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer, bandmates, friends — talking about his childhood, his relationships, his music, his career, his religion and his politics. Reading Bunny Wailer’s meloncholy recollections of a young Bob (“Bob was not a child who get anything that he sought. He didn’t get what any other child got.”) shines a new light on the world-famous icon. Anecdotes like the one from Esther Anderson, Marley’s companion in the early 70s (“Bob wrote ‘Get Up Stand Up’ in 20 minutes on a flight from Haiti to Jamaica. I was teaching Bob how to be a rebel, based on what I learned from living with Marlon Brando.”) and Wailer guitarist, Al Anderson (“Prince Charles and Bob met briefly in a transit lounge. The Prince wanted to know where Bob got his sneakers.”) make the legend more human.

Although arranged chronologically, it’s enjoyable no matter which page you open the book to. No critiquing of the music nor analyzing of the man here; just what the people who knew him best had to say about him. •


September-October 2017